• Ayesha Ashfaq

Life best explained by a 3-year-old

Ayesha reflects on watching a Youtube video of a 3-year-old focusing on positivity amid distressing "interview" questions.


It is quite difficult to summarize adulthood in one word but if I were to do so, I would say it is rather overwhelming. The weight of ever-growing responsibilities as you grow older can be tough to shoulder for most. You will hardly find a perfectly functioning adult – half the problems arise from one’s mental exhaustion. Recent times have been nothing but a series of unfortunate events. So, to cope, I did what most of you would have done as well. I binge-watched random Youtube videos to distract myself. In doing so, I came across an adorable video.


The video was an instant mood booster. An influencer interviews her 3-year-old baby brother, asking him seemingly complex and distressing questions she gathered from her followers. But the child’s responses are hilariously misleading and nonsensical. Eventually, it made me reflect on the child’s behavior. Throughout the interview session, he was only concerned with wanting to eat yummy treats and babbled about wanting to play and how much he loved his family. He did not seem upset when bombarded with dismal scenarios; he barely focused on any negativity. And in a weird, inexplicable way, it motivated me to behave more like that 3-year-old.


Nonetheless, the child is free from any sort of dreadful responsibilities, and we should not abandon

all our obligations and completely imitate a ‘child’, but what I want you to take away from this is

that sometimes you need to take a break. Our productivity does not equal working ourselves to

the bone. But sometimes, we just need to take a step back, indulge in comfort snacks, and interact

with our friends and family. And doing so is perfectly acceptable. Maybe we shouldn't behave like a child in the literal sense, but, rather, we should not take everything personally. Because, as cliché, as it may sound, no amount of guilt can change the future and no amount of worry can change the future.

So, instead of lamenting your past mistakes, forgive yourself. Instead of harshly overworking

yourself to burnout, allow yourself to grow at your own pace. And in the meantime, enjoy and

have as much fun in your present as a 3-year-old would.


(NOTE: The article intends no harm or aims to invalidate the struggles of the audience. Please, do not hesitate to seek out professional help!)